Still Composing a Life…

Still Composing a Life…

After college, I read Mary Catherine Bateson's Composing a Life. Even then I knew I wasn't destined for a linear career trajectory. My parent's hope for that smooth path died as soon as I came home from my second year of college and announced I was majoring in Religion. My first generation college student/accountant father was especially challenged by my choice.

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Growing up, Graduation, and Gratitude

Growing up, Graduation, and Gratitude

Dear Friends and Family,

Max has graduated high school! I still can’t believe it. So many of you have had a hand in raising this boy.

For those of you who were with me during the early and sometimes dark periods of new motherhood, thank you. 

You, who joined me at Tompkins Square Park and celebrated birthdays of my bright blond boy in very small NYC spaces, thank you. 

Those of us who together walked the city streets on 9/11 coming to terms with the fact that we were raising our children in a world very different from the one we were raised in….for your love, your hugs, your disbelief, and your witness to the good that we encountered during those days, thank you.

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Olympic Feats of Friendship

Olympic Feats of Friendship

The second day of our Obie reunion we decided to hike to see Marymere Falls in Olympic National Park. It was a short walk and close to the Lake Crescent Lodge where we were staying. It started off simple enough. For a prairie girl, the trees were the tallest I have ever seen. Green everywhere. Moss covered every limb. The omnipresent mist saturated everything. The hike was simple enough. We crossed a few bridges over Barnes Creek. It rained intermittently. We were sopping wet, even with our rain gear.

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Ojo FEARytale Part 2: The Only Way Out is Through

Ojo FEARytale Part 2: The Only Way Out is Through

What a great teacher fear can be. My first night at the Ojo Cabin I opted to potentially wet the bed instead of going to the outhouse in the middle of the night. My fear of creatures, combined with being alone, made my sense of adventure wane after sunset. For those who are curious? I didn't wet the futon. 

The next morning, after making some low tech coffee, I met Dave's wife and the three of us visited. Dave encouraged me to walk the labyrinth before I left for Ojo Caliente Springs. The trail passed ancient pueblo ruins. The sun was bright. Dave was clearing the brush from the trail, so I figured if I screamed, he'd hear me. 

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An Ojo FEARytale: Part 1

An Ojo FEARytale: Part 1

Dave, my host at my first night’s lodging in Ojo Caliente, guided me from the moment I crossed into New Mexico.

He had warned GPS was unreliable and with a pretty big mountain thunderstorm underway and after 13 hours of driving I was one tired traveler and not surprisingly, got lost.

Dave managed to instantly calm me with his über chill vibe and the soothing rhythm in his voice I associate with a native southwest accent. When I finally found the right road and turned off 285 a tall, skinny big bird was opening the gate for me. It was Dave in his heavy yellow rain jacket.

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Will to Openness Instead of Will to Power

Will to Openness Instead of Will to Power

Are you overwhelmed by the onslaught of suggestions about New Year's Resolutions? Lose weight. Get in shape. Spend more time with family. According to the pollsters at Marist, the top resolutions for 2018 are  - being a better person and losing weight. Being a better person is a bit fuzzy about how one would achieve that. But losing weight? That's one we can track. But by January 8th? Twenty-five percent of us report that our resolutions have gone by the wayside. Seven days and we are done. 

Recently I came across an article by Professor Brent Robbins, a psychology professor at Point Park University. Referencing some of my favorite thinkers, Martin Buber and Meister Eckhart, he wrote about a "will to openness" as a way of being in the world as opposed to a "will to power." 

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